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In today's world Big Data is not only big business it is big government. Deirdre Curtin highlights the urgent need to much more systemically grapple with challenges of transparency and of accountability and even to rethink some of the foundations of public law and access to justice in particular. Attendance is free, registration is requested.

Detail Summary
Date 12 December 2016
Time 16:00 -17:30
Location
Allard Pierson Museum
Room Nina van Leerzaal
Organised by Prof. Deirdre Curtin, European University Institute and University of Amsterdam
D.M. Curtin
Photo: Jeroen Oerlemans

Programme

  • 15:30 Room open
  • 16.00 - 17.30 Lecture by Deirdre Curtin followed by debate
  • 17.30 - 19.00 Public reception

Abstract

In today's world Big Data is not only big business it is big government. Big government is partly post-national, also in Europe. It spans various institutions, agencies, global, European and national, as well as the external relations of actors such as the EU and third states. At its core is an acceleration and intensification of a system of information sharing or information exchange by data ‘gatherers’ of various kinds, European, national, third country, global, public and private. The result is a highly incremental, inter-dependent hotchpotch that builds up almost imperceptibly, crisscrossing in a complex and largely unseen fashion the private and the public spheres. The focus nowadays is very much on the operationalization of security and its administration in practice. Enhanced ‘securitization’ takes place less visibly in the realm of law enforcement ‘co-operation’ between agencies nationally, supra-nationally and even globally.  Beyond a focus on legislation (the General Data Protection Regulation) or case-law (Schrems and its progeny), important though they are, this lecture highlights the urgent need to much more systemically grapple with challenges of transparency and of accountability and even to rethink some of the foundations of public law and access to justice in particular.

Discussants

  • Marieke De Goede, Professor of Politics, University of Amsterdam, Department of Politics
  • Natali Helberger, Professor of Information Law, University of Amsterdam, Institute for Information Law, 

The Speaker

Deirdre Curtin is Professor of European Law at the European University Institute in Florence, where she holds a Joint Chair of the Law Department and the Robert Schuman Centre. Until the beginning of 2016, she directed the Amsterdam Centre for European Law and Governance, which she founded in 2009, and was research leader of several innovative research projects embracing both law and political science, including Compound Constitution(s) in Europe, The Architecture of Postnational Rulemaking and the ‘European Law and Governance theme’ within ACCESS EUROPE. Deirdre Curtin authored and co-authored a number of scientific monographs published with leading international publishers, including Executive Power of the European Union (Oxford University Press 2009) and The Real World of EU Accountability: What deficit? (Oxford University Press 2010 with Paul ‘t Hart and Mark Bovens), and publishes regularly in leading law and political science journals. She remains Professor at the Law Department of the University of Amsterdam.

Allard Pierson Museum

Room Nina van Leerzaal

Oude Turfmarkt 127-129
1012 GC Amsterdam