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In his luncheon lecture, ACIL visiting fellow Mark B. Taylor (University of Oslo, Fafo Research Foundation) will examine the development of relevant international law norms in interaction with the demise of plunder-based systems of warfare in Europe, colonial systems of exploitation, the rise of industry capacity as the basis of modern war economies, wars of national liberation and the (re)turn to 'New Wars’.

Detail Summary
Date 6 May 2019
Time 12:00 - 13:00

Abstract

The economic dimensions of armed conflict are among the oldest themes of international law. The normative substance of the law has changed radically over several centuries, from a pre-modern regulation of appropriation of property and exploitation of labour based on the right of conquest, to its normative opposite: a prohibition in modern international law against appropriation and exploitation in war, and the regulation of war economies. This ACIL lunch talk charts the trajectory of this change over two centuries (on the basis of a work-in-progress), examining the development of relevant international law norms in interaction with the demise of plunder-based systems of warfare in Europe, colonial systems of exploitation, the rise of industry capacity as the basis of modern war economies, wars of national liberation and the (re)turn to 'New Wars’.  

 

About the speaker

Mark B. Taylor is a Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Private Law, University of Oslo and a Senior Researcher, Fafo Research Foundation, Oslo. Mark writes on legal and policy frameworks applicable to responsible business, and he will be with us at ACIL as a visiting fellow until the summer break. During his stay, he is pursuing postdoctoral research on human rights and climate litigation as part of attempts to regulate corporate sustainability, part of the project Sustainable Market Actors for Responsible Trade (SMART) (2018-2020, EU Horizon 2020), led by the University of Oslo. Mark has two books forthcoming - one on “War Economies and International Law: Regulating the Economic Activity of Armed Conflict” (based on his PhD thesis), as well as a co-authored text book on business and human rights. Mark is an advisor to various initiatives in the field of responsible business and is a member of the Norwegian Ethics Information Commission (2018-2019), a government commission which is considering a proposed law on human rights information in the global value chains of Norwegian business.